Connect with us

Markets in a Minute

Mapped: Economic Predictions for 2022 and Beyond

Published

on

2021 GDP Recap Part 1 of 2
Future GDP Predictions Part 2 of 2

How to use: Arrows on side navigate between 2022 and 2023.

World map shaded according to GDP growth by country in 2022
World map with countries coloured according to economic predictions for 2023
Economic Predictions for 2022_2022 Map
Economic Predictions for 2022_2023 Map
previous arrow
next arrow
World map with countries coloured according to economic predictions for 2022

This infographic is available as a poster.

Economic Predictions for 2022 and Beyond

How resilient will countries be in 2022? Economies have to contend with commodity shortages related to the Russia-Ukraine war, supply chain issues due to lockdowns in China, and tightening monetary policy as inflation rises.

In light of these challenges, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has lowered its economic predictions for 2022 and beyond. The IMF predicts that global GDP growth will slow from 6.1% in 2021 to 3.6% in 2022 and 2023.

In this Markets in a Minute from New York Life Investments, we explore GDP projections by country. It’s the second in a two-part series that explores GDP growth around the world.

GDP Forecasts by Country

Due to the war in Ukraine, the IMF notes that the economic predictions for 2022 and beyond have considerable uncertainty. The projections also assume that the conflict remains confined to Ukraine and that the pandemic’s health and economic consequences lessen during 2022.

Here are the IMF’s predictions for real GDP growth by country. Unsurprisingly, Ukraine will have the most severe contraction of -35% this year. Russia’s invasion has damaged or destroyed 30% of the nation’s infrastructure, and more than 14 million people have fled their homes.

Jurisdiction2022P2023P
Afghanistann/an/a
Albania2.0%2.8%
Algeria2.4%2.4%
Andorra4.5%2.7%
Angola3.0%3.3%
Antigua and Barbuda6.5%5.4%
Argentina4.0%3.0%
Armenia1.5%4.0%
Aruba2.7%3.7%
Australia4.2%2.5%
Austria2.6%3.0%
Azerbaijan2.8%2.6%
Bahrain3.3%3.0%
Bangladesh6.4%6.7%
Barbados11.2%4.9%
Belarus-6.4%0.4%
Belgium2.1%1.4%
Belize5.7%3.4%
Benin5.9%6.2%
Bhutan4.4%4.5%
Bolivia3.8%3.7%
Bosnia and Herzegovina2.5%2.3%
Botswana4.3%4.2%
Brazil0.8%1.4%
Brunei Darussalam5.8%2.6%
Bulgaria3.2%4.5%
Burkina Faso4.7%5.0%
Burundi3.6%4.6%
Cabo Verde5.2%5.8%
Cambodia5.1%5.9%
Cameroon4.3%4.9%
Canada3.9%2.8%
Central African Republic3.5%3.7%
Chad3.3%3.5%
Chile1.5%0.5%
China4.4%5.1%
Colombia5.8%3.6%
Comoros3.5%3.7%
Costa Rica3.3%3.1%
Croatia2.7%4.0%
Côte d'Ivoire6.0%6.7%
Cyprus2.1%3.5%
Czech Republic2.3%4.2%
Democratic Republic of the Congo6.4%6.9%
Denmark2.3%1.7%
Djibouti3.0%5.0%
Dominica6.8%5.0%
Dominican Republic5.5%5.0%
Ecuador2.9%2.7%
Egypt5.9%5.0%
El Salvador3.0%2.3%
Equatorial Guinea6.1%-2.9%
Eritrea4.7%3.6%
Estonia0.2%2.2%
Eswatini2.1%1.8%
Ethiopia3.8%5.7%
Fiji6.8%7.7%
Finland1.6%1.7%
France2.9%1.4%
Gabon2.7%3.4%
Georgia3.2%5.8%
Germany2.1%2.7%
Ghana5.2%5.1%
Greece3.5%2.6%
Grenada3.6%3.6%
Guatemala4.0%3.6%
Guinea4.8%5.8%
Guinea-Bissau3.8%4.5%
Guyana47.2%34.5%
Haiti0.3%1.4%
Honduras3.8%3.5%
Hong Kong SAR0.5%4.9%
Hungary3.7%3.6%
Iceland3.3%2.3%
India8.2%6.9%
Indonesia5.4%6.0%
Iraq9.5%5.7%
Ireland5.2%5.0%
Islamic Republic of Iran3.0%2.0%
Israel5.0%3.5%
Italy2.3%1.7%
Jamaica2.5%3.3%
Japan2.4%2.3%
Jordan2.4%3.1%
Kazakhstan2.3%4.4%
Kenya5.7%5.3%
Kiribati1.1%2.8%
Korea2.5%2.9%
Kosovo2.8%3.9%
Kuwait8.2%2.6%
Kyrgyz Republic0.9%5.0%
Lao P.D.R.3.2%3.5%
Latvia1.0%2.4%
Lebanonn/an/a
Lesotho3.1%1.6%
Liberia4.5%5.5%
Libya3.5%4.4%
Lithuania1.8%2.6%
Luxembourg1.8%2.1%
Macao SAR15.5%23.3%
Madagascar5.1%5.2%
Malawi2.7%4.3%
Malaysia5.6%5.5%
Maldives6.1%8.9%
Mali2.0%5.3%
Malta4.8%4.5%
Marshall Islands2.0%3.2%
Mauritania5.0%4.4%
Mauritius6.1%5.6%
Mexico2.0%2.5%
Micronesia-0.5%2.8%
Moldova0.3%2.0%
Mongolia2.0%7.0%
Montenegro3.8%4.2%
Morocco1.1%4.6%
Mozambique3.8%5.0%
Myanmar1.6%3.0%
Namibia2.8%3.7%
Nauru0.9%2.0%
Nepal4.1%6.1%
Netherlands3.0%2.0%
New Zealand2.7%2.6%
Nicaragua3.8%2.2%
Niger6.9%7.2%
Nigeria3.4%3.1%
North Macedonia3.2%2.7%
Norway4.0%2.6%
Oman5.6%2.7%
Pakistan4.0%4.2%
Palau8.1%18.8%
Panama7.5%5.0%
Papua New Guinea4.8%4.3%
Paraguay0.3%4.5%
Peru3.0%3.0%
Philippines6.5%6.3%
Poland3.7%2.9%
Portugal4.0%2.1%
Puerto Rico4.8%0.4%
Qatar3.4%2.5%
Republic of Congo2.4%2.7%
Romania2.2%3.4%
Russia-8.5%-2.3%
Rwanda6.4%7.4%
São Tomé and Prìncipe1.6%2.8%
Samoa0.0%4.0%
San Marino1.3%1.1%
Saudi Arabia7.6%3.6%
Senegal5.0%9.2%
Serbia3.5%4.0%
Seychelles4.6%5.6%
Sierra Leone3.4%4.3%
Singapore4.0%2.9%
Slovak Republic2.6%5.0%
Slovenia3.7%3.0%
Solomon Islands-4.0%3.2%
Somalia3.0%3.6%
South Africa1.9%1.4%
South Sudan6.5%5.6%
Spain4.8%3.3%
Sri Lanka2.6%2.7%
St. Kitts and Nevis10.0%4.7%
St. Lucia9.7%6.0%
St. Vincent and the Grenadines5.0%6.4%
Sudan0.3%3.9%
Suriname1.8%2.1%
Sweden2.9%2.7%
Switzerland2.2%1.4%
Syrian/an/a
Taiwan Province of China3.2%2.9%
Tajikistan2.5%3.5%
Tanzania4.8%5.2%
Thailand3.3%4.3%
The Bahamas6.0%4.1%
The Gambia5.6%6.2%
Timor-Leste2.0%3.6%
Togo5.6%6.2%
Tonga-1.7%3.0%
Trinidad and Tobago5.5%3.0%
Tunisia2.2%n/a
Turkey2.7%3.0%
Turkmenistan1.6%2.5%
Tuvalu3.0%3.5%
Uganda4.9%6.5%
Ukraine-35.0%n/a
United Arab Emirates4.2%3.8%
United Kingdom3.7%1.2%
United States3.7%2.3%
Uruguay3.9%3.0%
Uzbekistan3.4%5.0%
Vanuatu2.2%3.4%
Venezuela1.5%1.5%
Vietnam6.0%7.2%
West Bank and Gaza4.0%3.5%
Yemen1.0%2.5%
Zambia3.1%3.6%
Zimbabwe3.5%3.0%

Guyana, a country of less than 800,000 people in South America, is forecast to have the highest GDP growth of 47.2% in 2022 and 34.5% in 2023. The country has begun to rapidly develop its offshore oil industry, with oil earnings estimated to make up nearly 40% of its GDP.

In Asia, India is projected to see strong growth of 8.2% in 2022 and 6.9% in 2023. The growth is supported by government spending and economic reforms, such as lowering the corporate tax rate and allowing more foreign direct investment. In fact, foreign direct investment reached a record $84 billion in 2021-22.

Meanwhile, the IMF predicts that GDP growth in the U.S. will hit 3.7% in 2022 and 2.3% in 2023. The Russia-Ukraine war is expected to slow growth in America’s trading partners, reducing their demand for American goods. The central bank has also withdrawn U.S. monetary support faster than expected as rates rise to combat inflation. Even still, the IMF expects that the U.S. will reach its pre-pandemic trend output path by 2022.

Supporting Growth

Certainly, there are a number of risks facing the global economy. Countries with strong fiscal and monetary support, as well as countries with in-demand exports, have some of the best economic predictions for 2022 and beyond.

The IMF also offers countries various recommendations in order to support growth. For instance, central banks can offer clear interest rate guidance to minimize surprises that disrupt the markets. Governments can continue offering targeted fiscal support to vulnerable populations, such as refugees and households most impacted by the pandemic.

Over the longer-term, countries can focus on reskilling their workforce for the digital transformation, investing in renewables for the green transition, and improving the resiliency of global supply chains.

Advisor channel footer

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading
Comments

Markets in a Minute

Identifying Trends With the Relative Strength Index

When is the S&P 500 Index considered overbought or oversold? The relative strength index may offer some answers to identifying market trends.

Published

on

This infographic is available as a poster.

Identifying Market Trends: The Relative Strength Index

What happens when the S&P 500 Index enters oversold territory? Does the market reverse, or continue on this trend?

A widely-used momentum indicator, the relative strength index (RSI) may offer some insight. The RSI is an indicator that may show when a stock or index is overbought or oversold during a specific period of time, indicating a potential buying opportunity.

This Markets in a Minute from New York Life Investments looks at the RSI of the S&P 500 Index over the last three decades to show how the market performed after different periods of overbought or oversold conditions

What is the Relative Strength Index?

The RSI measures the scale of price movements of a stock or index. In short, the RSI is used to calculate the average gains of a stock divided by the average losses over a certain time period. These are then tracked across a scale of 0 to 100. Broadly speaking, a stock is considered overbought if it reads 70 or above and it is considered oversold if it is 30 or below.

For example, when the S&P 500 Index has a RSI of 85, an investor may consider it overbought and sell their shares. Conversely, if the RSI hits 25, an investor may buy the S&P 500 thinking the market will bounce back.

The RSI is often used with other indicators to identify market trends.

The Relative Strength Index and S&P 500 Returns

Below, we show the 12-month returns of the S&P 500 Index after key ‘overbought’ or ‘oversold’ conditions in the market as indicated by the RSI:

DateRSIShiller PE Ratio*S&P 500 Index 12-Month Return
Jul 15 200220239.4%
Dec 4 200673274.5%
Oct 13 200815167.3%
Feb 7 201175231.9%
May 13 2013752316.1%
Jan 8 20188933-7.2%
Mar 16 2020222566.3%
May 3 202172370.0%

*Measured by the average inflation-adjusted earnings of the S&P over 10 years

As the above table shows, following each period of extremely oversold territory in the RSI, the S&P 500 Index had positive returns.

In fact, the S&P 500 Index had the strongest one-year returns following the COVID-19 crisis of March 2020, with over 66% 12-month returns. During the time of extreme fear, the RSI sank to deeply oversold territory before sharply rebounding.

Interestingly, following periods of extremely overbought conditions in the market there was a range of positive and negative performance. Most recently, before the peak of the last cycle in 2021, the S&P 500 Index spent roughly 9 months in ‘overbought’ territory before declining into 2022.

The Relative Strength Index in 2022

With the economy in uncertain territory, how does the RSI look today?

In early June, following a bleak consumer sentiment announcement, the RSI fell to 30, hovering on oversold territory. Since then, it has risen closer to 40 as consumer sentiment and perspectives on economic conditions have slightly improved.

However, whether or not the RSI will continue on this uptrend remains to be seen.

For the remainder of 2022, market sentiment, which may be shaped by the coming GDP and inflation figures, could push RSI into oversold territory once again. As a bright spot this may be good news—reinforcing a turning point in the market.

Advisor channel footer

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading

Markets in a Minute

Visualized: How Bonds Help Reduce Bear Market Risk

How have bonds historically performed during a bear market? How have different stock and bond allocations performed?

Published

on

Bear Market Risk

This infographic is available as a poster.

Visualized: How Bonds Help Reduce Bear Market Risk

Which tactics can investors use to reduce portfolio downside risk?

One time-tested method is allocating to bonds. Bonds have sheltered portfolio losses during bear markets thanks to the lower risk profile of bonds compared to stocks. Often, when stocks declined during market selloffs, safer assets like bonds tended to increase as the demand for stability grew.

This Markets in a Minute from New York Life Investments shows the performance of bonds and stocks during bear markets since World War II.

Bond Performance During Bear Markets

Bear markets are defined as a 20% or more decline in U.S. large cap stocks from peak to trough. Since World War II, bear markets have occurred less frequently than bull markets, with the U.S. stock market spending 29% in a bear market versus 71% in a bull market.

With this in mind, we show how a spectrum of portfolio asset allocations to stocks and bonds have performed over the last several bear markets.

  • Stocks: represented by U.S. large cap stocks
  • Bonds: represented by U.S. intermediate government bonds, which are issued with maturity dates between two and five years
Allocation (Stock / Bond)Average DrawdownAverage Time Until Recovery*
100% / 0%-34%3.3 years
90% / 10%-31%3.2 years
80% / 20%-28%2.9 years
70% / 30%-24%2.8 years
60% / 40%-20%2.5 years
50% / 50%-16%2.1 years
40% / 60%-11%1.2 years
30% / 70%-7%0.8 years
20% / 80%-4%0.8 years
10% / 90%-2%0.5 years
0% / 100%-1%0.2 years

*Length of time until new all-time high

For a 100% stock portfolio, the average drawdown was -34%, with 3.3 years until recovery—the time it took to reach a new all-time high.

Comparatively, a portfolio entirely made up of bonds fell -1% on average during bear markets with a recovery time of just a few months.

Balanced Portfolios in Bear Markets

Looking closer, we show how adding bonds to a portfolio has cushioned portfolio losses over the following market downturns, sometimes by as much as 20 percentage points.

Bear Market100% Stock Portfolio Max Drawdown60/40 Portfolio Max Drawdown
2020-20%-10%
2008-51%-30%
2001-45%-22%
1988-30%-17%
1973-43%-26%
1969-29%-18%
1962-22%-13%
1947-22%-13%

A balanced 60/40 portfolio had a 20% average drawdown, recovering in 2.5 years. During the 2020 COVID-19 crash, for instance, a 60/40 portfolio fell almost 10% and fully recovered in six months. By contrast, a 100% stock portfolio declined nearly 20%.

In all of the above historical downturns, investors with a diversified portfolio have been better positioned in a bear market.

Building Portfolio Strength

Bonds have historically seen less volatility than stocks during tougher financial conditions. Typically, riskier assets like stocks have been more prone to market fluctuations than bonds.

To prepare for a bear market, investors can structure a portfolio that aligns with their risk tolerance. Over the long run, the diversification benefits of bonds have been fundamental to protecting portfolios and lowering risk.

Advisor channel footer

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading
New York Life Investments

Subscribe

Are you a financial advisor?

Subscribe here to get every update, including when new charts or infographics go live:

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Popular