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Animated Map: An Economic Forecast for the COVID-19 Recovery (2020-21)

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Animation: An Economic Forecast for the COVID-19 Recovery (2020-21)

Economic Forecast

This Markets in a Minute Chart is available as a poster.

COVID-19 Recovery: A Global Economic Forecast

As governments enact COVID-19 containment measures, economies around the world have slowed to a crawl. Many people find themselves out of work, and businesses are struggling to stay afloat amid strict regulations and plummeting demand.

However, while current economic conditions are bleak, some forecasts for the upcoming recovery provide room for investor optimism. According to the most recent forecast from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), it’s projected that the global economy will contract by 3% in 2020, followed by 5.8% growth in 2021.

In today’s Markets in a Minute from New York Life Investments, we take a look at the country-level economic forecast to highlight which areas may recover the fastest.

Emerging from The Great Lockdown

Given the numerous uncertainties COVID-19 brings, preparing an economic forecast was no easy task. The IMF’s most recent projections assume that the pandemic fades in the second half of 2020, containment efforts are gradually unwound, and governments provide policy support.

With this in mind, which countries are expected to see the strongest recoveries? Below is the full country-level forecast, sorted by projected real GDP growth in 2021.

Real GDP, Annual Percentage Change
2019 Actual, 2020-2021 Projected

Jurisdiction20192020P2021P
Libya9.9–58.780.7
Macao SAR–4.7–29.632.0
Palau0.5–11.914.4
Maldives5.7–8.113.2
Aruba0.4–13.712.1
Bangladesh7.92.09.5
China6.11.29.2
Malaysia4.3–1.79.0
Côte d'Ivoire6.92.78.7
St. Kitts and Nevis2.9–8.18.5
Djibouti7.51.08.5
Latvia2.2–8.68.3
Lithuania3.9–8.18.2
Indonesia5.00.58.2
Niger5.81.08.1
Mongolia5.1–1.08.0
Albania2.2–5.08.0
Antigua and Barbuda5.3–10.08.0
Kyrgyz Republic4.5–4.08.0
Seychelles3.9–10.88.0
Estonia4.3–7.57.9
Philippines5.90.67.6
Belize0.3–12.07.6
Guinea5.62.97.6
Czech Republic2.6–6.57.5
Myanmar6.51.87.5
Kosovo4.0–5.07.5
Serbia4.2–3.07.5
India4.21.97.4
Iraq3.9–4.77.2
Barbados–0.1–7.67.1
Malta4.4–2.87.0
Fiji0.5–5.87.0
Vietnam7.02.77.0
North Macedonia3.6–4.07.0
Uzbekistan5.61.87.0
St. Lucia1.7–8.56.9
Botswana3.0–5.46.8
The Bahamas1.8–8.36.7
Rwanda10.13.56.7
Montenegro3.6–9.06.5
The Gambia6.02.56.5
Turkmenistan6.31.86.4
Ireland5.5–6.86.3
Guyana4.752.86.3
Algeria0.7–5.26.2
Australia1.8–6.76.1
Cambodia7.0–1.66.1
Thailand2.4–6.76.1
Grenada3.1–8.06.1
Yemen2.1–3.06.1
Chad3.0–0.26.1
Kenya5.61.06.1
Denmark2.4–6.56.0
Iceland1.9–7.26.0
Bulgaria3.4–4.06.0
Benin6.44.56.0
New Zealand2.2–7.25.9
Eritrea3.80.15.9
Ghana6.11.55.9
Mauritius3.5–6.85.9
Burkina Faso5.72.05.8
Cyprus3.2–6.55.6
Lao P.D.R.4.70.75.6
Guatemala3.6–2.05.5
Tajikistan7.51.05.5
Cabo Verde5.5–4.05.5
São Tomé and Príncipe1.3–6.05.5
Senegal5.33.05.5
Slovenia2.4–8.05.4
San Marino1.1–12.25.4
St. Vincent and the Grenadines0.4–4.55.4
Chile1.1–4.55.3
Germany0.6–7.05.2
Sweden1.2–6.85.2
Peru2.2–4.55.2
Greece1.9–10.05.1
Lesotho1.2–5.25.1
Portugal2.2–8.05.0
Slovak Republic2.3–6.25.0
Israel3.5–6.35.0
Nepal7.12.55.0
Turkey0.9–5.05.0
Uruguay0.2–3.05.0
Qatar0.1–4.35.0
Madagascar4.80.45.0
Vanuatu2.9–3.34.9
Croatia2.9–9.04.9
Suriname2.3–4.94.9
Italy0.3–9.14.8
Luxembourg2.3–4.94.8
Armenia7.6–1.54.8
Morocco2.2–3.74.8
United States2.3–5.94.7
Mozambique2.22.24.7
Belgium1.4–6.94.6
Tanzania6.32.04.6
France1.3–7.24.5
Austria1.6–7.04.5
El Salvador2.4–5.44.5
Afghanistan3.0–3.04.5
Argentina–2.2–5.74.4
Spain2.0–8.04.3
Ethiopia9.03.24.3
Uganda4.93.54.3
Canada1.6–6.24.2
Sri Lanka2.3–0.54.2
Hungary4.9–3.14.2
Poland4.1–4.64.2
Mauritania5.9–2.04.2
Burundi1.8–5.54.2
Moldova3.6–3.04.1
Honduras2.7–2.44.1
Kazakhstan4.5–2.54.1
Tunisia1.0–4.34.1
Cameroon3.7–1.24.1
Mali5.11.54.1
United Kingdom1.4–6.54.0
Dominican Republic5.1–1.04.0
Panama3.0–2.04.0
Paraguay0.2–1.04.0
Central African Republic3.01.04.0
Liberia–2.5–2.54.0
Sierra Leone5.1–2.34.0
South Africa0.2–5.84.0
Togo5.31.04.0
Hong Kong SAR–1.2–4.83.9
Romania4.1–5.03.9
Ecuador0.1–6.33.9
Switzerland0.9–6.03.8
Solomon Islands1.2–2.13.8
Timor-Leste3.1–3.03.8
Colombia3.3–2.43.7
Jordan2.0–3.73.7
Ukraine3.2–7.73.6
Gabon3.4–1.23.6
Taiwan Province of China2.7–4.03.5
Brunei Darussalam3.91.33.5
Tuvalu6.0–1.03.5
Belarus1.2–6.03.5
Bosnia and Herzegovina2.7–5.03.5
Russia1.3–5.53.5
Jamaica1.0–5.63.5
Democratic Republic of the Congo4.4–2.23.5
Korea2.0–1.23.4
Dominica9.2–4.73.4
Kuwait0.7–1.13.4
Republic of Congo–0.9–2.33.4
United Arab Emirates1.3–3.53.3
Marshall Islands2.4–0.23.2
Namibia–1.4–2.53.2
South Sudan11.34.93.2
Finland1.0–6.03.1
Iran–7.6–6.03.1
Comoros1.9–1.23.1
Netherlands1.8–7.53.0
Japan0.7–5.23.0
Singapore0.7–3.53.0
Costa Rica2.1–3.33.0
Mexico–0.1–6.63.0
Bahrain1.8–3.63.0
Georgia5.1–4.03.0
Oman0.5–2.83.0
Guinea-Bissau4.6–1.53.0
Norway1.2–6.32.9
Bhutan5.32.72.9
Papua New Guinea5.0–1.02.9
Bolivia2.8–2.92.9
Brazil1.1–5.32.9
Saudi Arabia0.3–2.32.9
Somalia2.9–2.52.9
Egypt5.62.02.8
Trinidad and Tobago–0.0–4.52.6
Angola–1.5–1.42.6
Malawi4.51.02.5
Zimbabwe–8.3–7.42.5
Nigeria2.2–3.42.4
Equatorial Guinea–6.1–5.52.3
Zambia1.5–3.52.3
Kiribati2.30.02.2
Pakistan3.3–1.52.0
Eswatini1.0–0.91.8
Puerto Rico2.0–6.01.5
Micronesia1.2–0.41.4
Nauru1.0–1.71.3
Tonga–0.1–1.21.2
Haiti–1.2–4.01.2
Azerbaijan2.3–2.20.7
Samoa3.5–3.70.5
Nicaragua–3.9–6.00.0
Sudan–2.5–7.2–3.0
Venezuela–35.0–15.0–5.0
Lebanon–6.5–12.0No data
SyriaNo dataNo dataNo data

Libya is forecast to have the highest growth in 2021, as well as the deepest contraction in 2020. However, the IMF notes the reliability of this data is low given Libya is currently facing a civil war and weak capacity.

Emerging and developing Asia is expected to have a strong recovery, with China and India predicted to see 2021 growth rates of 9.2% and 7.4% respectively. For China, this is a welcome change after its first quarter GDP contracted by 6.8%, the first decline since at least 1992.

The IMF predicts the U.S. will see GDP growth of 4.7% in 2021, which is slightly higher than the 4.5% average for advanced economies. Separately, the U.S. Federal Reserve also believes the economy will recover relatively quickly given the country entered the pandemic on strong economic footing.

There is every reason to believe that the economic rebound, when it comes, can be robust.

Jerome Powell, U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman

In the meantime, the Federal Reserve says it is committed to providing financing programs and maintaining low interest rates to help boost the economy.

Spotting Opportunity

As the pandemic subsides, broad-based stimulus will be critical for economic recoveries. Clear communication on the state of the pandemic, and the decline of new infections, will also help instill consumer confidence.

Investors can consider these factors, as well as the IMF’s forecast, as they look to diversify geographically. This allows investors to take advantage of areas with the highest potential growth.

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Markets in a Minute

Asset Class Risk and Return Over the Last Decade (2010-2019)

Asset allocation is one of the most important decisions an investor can make. This chart shows asset class risk and return from 2010-2019.

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Asset Class Risk and Return

This Markets in a Minute Chart is available as a poster.

The Importance of Asset Classes

Asset allocation is one of the most important decisions an investor can make. In fact, studies have found that the percentage of each asset type held in a portfolio is a bigger contributor to returns than individual security selection.

However, it’s important for investors to select asset classes that align with their personal risk tolerance—which can differ based on how long they plan to hold an investment—and their targeted returns. This Markets in a Minute chart from New York Life Investments shows asset class risk and return data from 2010-2019 to highlight their different profiles.

Asset Class Risk and Return

To measure risk and return, we took annualized return and standard deviation data over the last ten years.

Annualized returns show what an investor would have earned over a timeframe if returns were compounded. It is useful because an investment’s value is dependent on the gains or losses experienced in prior time periods. For example, an investment that lost half of its value in the previous year would need to see a 100% return to break even.

Standard deviation indicates risk by measuring the amount of variation among a set of values. For example, equities have historically seen a wide range in returns, meaning they are more volatile and carry more risk. On the other hand, treasuries have typically seen a smaller range in returns, illustrating lower volatility levels.

Below is the risk and return for select asset classes from 2010-2019, organized from lowest return to highest return.

Asset ClassAnnualized ReturnAnnualized Standard Deviation
Global Commodities-5.38%16.60%
Emerging Markets Equity-0.89%16.95%
Treasury Coupons0.73%0.81%
Investment Grade Bonds3.17%2.92%
Hedge Funds4.05%5.70%
Corporate Bonds5.55%5.26%
Global Listed Private Equity5.59%18.63%
1-5yr High Yield Bonds6.71%1.00%
Global Equity6.75%12.50%
Global Equity - ESG Leaders6.87%12.03%
Taxable Municipal Bonds7.20%7.33%
Real Estate Investment Trusts8.44%11.03%
U.S. Mid Cap Equity11.00%13.60%
U.S. Large Cap Equity11.22%11.39%
Dividend-Paying Equity11.81%10.24%
U.S. Small Cap Equity11.87%14.46%

Note: See the bottom of the graphic for the specific indexes used.

Global commodities saw the lowest return over the last 10 years. Plummeting oil prices, and an equities bull market that left little demand for safe haven assets like precious metals, likely contributed to the asset class’ underperformance.

Backed by the U.S. federal government, Treasury coupons had the lowest volatility but also saw a relatively low return of 0.73%. In contrast, 1-5 year high yield bonds generated a return of 6.71% with only slightly more risk.

With the exception of emerging market equity, all selected equities had higher risk and relatively higher historical returns. Among the stocks shown, dividend-paying equity saw the highest returns relative to their risk level.

Building a Portfolio

As they consider asset class risk and return, investors should remember that historical performance does not indicate future results. In addition, the above data is somewhat limited in that it only shows performance during the recent bull market—and returns can vary in different stages of the market cycle. For example, commodities go through multi-decade periods of price ascent and decline known as super cycles.

However, historical information may help investors gauge the asset classes that are best suited to their personal goals. Whether an investor needs more stability to help save for a near-term vacation, or investments with higher return potential for retirement savings, they can build a portfolio tailored to their needs.

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Markets in a Minute

The Pyramid of Equity Returns: Almost 200 Years of U.S. Stock Performance

From 1825-2019, equities have had positive annual performance over 70% of the time. This chart shows historical U.S. stock market returns.

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historical stock market returns

This Markets in a Minute Chart is available as a poster.

Historical Stock Market Returns

After the fastest bear market drop in history, the S&P 500 rallied and now has a year-to-date total return of -4.7%. The year is not over, but in the context of history, is this in line with what’s considered a “normal” return, or is it more of an outlier?

In today’s Markets in a Minute chart from New York Life Investments, we show the distribution of U.S. equity returns over almost 200 years.

Total Returns By Year

The chart shows total annual returns, which assumes that dividends and other cash distributions are reinvested back into the index.

It’s also important to note that different indexes and data collection methods are used over the timeframe. From 1825-1925, numbers come from researchers at Yale University and Pennsylvania State University. They collected price and dividend data for almost all stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange during its early history.

From 1926-1956, returns are from the S&P 90, the S&P 500’s predecessor. Finally, from 1957 to date, returns are based on the S&P 500.

Here are historical stock market returns by year:

YearTotal Return
18252.53%
18262.03%
18272.97%
18282.82%
18293.21%
18302.83%
18311.70%
18323.02%
18332.94%
18342.91%
18352.83%
18361.59%
18372.11%
18386.27%
18395.28%
18403.53%
18414.87%
18425.77%
18437.18%
18446.85%
18454.16%
18463.36%
18475.55%
18485.17%
18497.60%
18503.73%
18514.44%
18524.52%
18534.11%
18541.99%
18552.09%
18563.00%
18573.39%
18582.83%
18592.86%
18602.41%
18613.21%
18623.60%
18633.52%
18644.18%
18653.97%
18664.39%
18674.50%
1868-
18694.18%
18704.20%
18715.86%
18726.33%
18736.51%
18747.47%
18756.61%
18766.86%
18775.31%
18785.54%
18795.80%
18805.28%
18815.48%
18825.32%
18835.65%
18845.81%
18855.53%
18864.23%
18874.43%
18884.36%
18894.28%
18904.14%
18914.78%
18924.44%
18934.54%
18944.76%
18954.42%
18964.17%
18974.27%
18984.21%
18993.72%
19004.98%
19014.66%
19024.15%
19034.35%
19044.72%
19054.00%
19064.19%
19074.47%
19086.09%
19094.87%
19104.56%
19115.19%
19125.27%
19135.12%
19145.22%
19155.85%
19165.91%
19177.04%
19188.38%
19196.71%
19205.72%
19216.75%
19226.98%
19236.04%
19246.43%
19255.91%
192611.62%
192737.49%
192843.61%
1929-8.42%
1930-24.90%
1931-43.34%
1932-8.19%
193353.99%
1934-1.44%
193547.67%
193633.92%
1937-35.03%
193831.12%
1939-0.41%
1940-9.78%
1941-11.59%
194220.34%
194325.90%
194419.75%
194536.44%
1946-8.07%
19475.71%
19485.50%
194918.79%
195031.71%
195124.02%
195218.37%
1953-0.99%
195452.62%
195531.56%
19566.56%
1957-10.78%
195843.36%
195911.96%
19600.47%
196126.89%
1962-8.73%
196322.80%
196416.48%
196512.45%
1966-10.06%
196723.98%
196811.06%
1969-8.50%
19704.01%
197114.31%
197218.98%
1973-14.66%
1974-26.47%
197537.20%
197623.84%
1977-7.18%
19786.56%
197918.44%
198032.42%
1981-4.91%
198221.55%
198322.56%
19846.27%
198531.73%
198618.67%
19875.25%
198816.61%
198931.69%
1990-3.10%
199130.47%
19927.62%
199310.08%
19941.32%
199537.58%
199622.96%
199733.36%
199828.58%
199921.04%
2000-9.10%
2001-11.89%
2002-22.10%
200328.68%
200410.88%
20054.91%
200615.79%
20075.49%
2008-37.00%
200926.46%
201015.06%
20112.11%
201216.00%
201332.39%
201413.69%
20151.38%
201611.96%
201721.83%
2018-4.38%
201931.49%

Source: Journal of Financial Markets, Slickcharts. The year 1868 has insufficient data to estimate a total annual return.

U.S. equity returns roughly follow a bell curve, meaning that values cluster near a central peak and values farther from the average are less common. Historically, they have been skewed towards positive performance.

Here is how the distribution of returns stack up:

Total Annual Return (%)-50 to -30-30 to -10-10 to 1010 to 3030 to 5050+
Number of Years Within Range3237765225
Percent of Years Within Range1.5%11.8%39.5%33.3%11.3%2.6%

While extreme returns can happen, almost 40% of annual returns have fallen within the -10% to 10% range.

Recessions and Recoveries

What does it look like when more abnormal returns occur? Due to the cyclical nature of the economy, recessions tend to be followed by strong recoveries.

recession and recovery stock market returns

In 1957, the year the S&P 500 was created, the stock market saw a loss of almost 11%. Stock prices shot up by over 43% the following year, bolstered by rising credit volumes and business profits.

Most recently, the 2008 global financial crisis led to one of the largest equity losses to date. In 2009, stocks climbed by almost 27%, boosted by expectations of higher capital spending and demand as the economy recovered.

What History Tells Us

While equities can have high volatility, returns have historically followed a positively-skewed bell curve distribution. From 1825-2019, the average total annual return was 8.25%. In fact, over 70% of total annual returns have been positive over the same timeframe.

Owning stocks long-term may help investors not only beat inflation, but also build a nest egg that may sustain them throughout their retirement years.

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