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Markets in a Minute

Visualizing the Length and Growth of Every Modern Bull Market

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Visualizing the Length and Growth of Every Modern Bull Market

This Markets in a Minute chart is available as a poster.

The Length and Growth of Every Modern Bull Market

Since 2009, U.S. stocks have sustained the longest bull market in modern history, with the S&P 500 rising by 400%.

Dubbed the “Long, Slow Recovery”, its name can be taken quite literally. At 131 months and counting, it’s the longest of its kind by a margin of 18 months. It’s also one of the slowest growing bull markets in history, compounding at a 16% compound annual growth rate (CAGR).

Today’s Markets In A Minute chart comes from New York Life Investments, which illustrates the length and growth of every U.S. bull market since World War II. From this, we can begin to recognize that bull markets vary quite significantly.

Tale of the Tape

Bull markets—which occur when stocks rise 20% above their low point—have happened 12 times in the S&P 500 since World War II. Here’s how they compare to one another.

NameLength
(months)
Total S&P 500 Change (%)Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR)
World War II (1942-1946)49158%26%
Post-war Boom (1949-1956)86266%20%
Cold War Ramps Up (1957-1961)5086%16%
JFK Aims to "Get America Moving Again" (1962-1966)4480%17%
The Go-go Years (1966-1968)2648%20%
Nifty Fifty (1970-1973)3274%23%
A Modest Bull (1974-1980)74126%14%
Reaganomics (1982-1987)60229%27%
Black Monday Comeback (1987-1990)3165%21%
Roaring 90s (1990-2000)113417%19%
Housing Boom (2002-2007)60102%15%
Long, Slow Recovery* (2009-Present)131400%16%

*Figures are as of Feb. 13, 2020
Source: CNBC, Yahoo Finance

Different Recipe, Same Result

History has shown us that bull markets can arise from a variety of scenarios. Here’s how some of the most significant ones came to fruition.

World War II (1942-1946)

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, America mobilized for war. As government spending climbed, several agencies were established to regulate and control the economy.

These measures led to the creation of 17 million jobs, and brought the U.S. unemployment rate to a record low of just 1.2%. While corporate profits after taxes doubled, income grew for virtually all Americans—manufacturing workers, for example, saw their real incomes rise by nearly a quarter from 1940 to 1945.

It is for these reasons, among others, that the World War II bull market boasts a 26% CAGR, one of the largest in modern history.

Reaganomics (1982-1987)

The bull market of 1982 to 1987 was ushered in by Ronald Reagan’s Economic Recovery Tax Act (ERTA), a historic set of policies based on “supply-side economics”, now famously known as Reaganomics.

Supply-side economics are based on the theory that reducing taxes incentivizes individuals and businesses to produce more. Thus, the ultimate goal of ERTA was to encourage American innovation and entrepreneurship. In practice, this meant reducing marginal tax rates—the top marginal tax rate fell from 70% to 50%, while the lowest rate fell from 14% to 11%.

These cuts were a powerful ingredient for the making of another bull market. The S&P 500 grew by 229% over 60 months, resulting in a record-breaking CAGR of 27%.

Roaring 90s (1990-2000)

Yet another appropriately named bull market, the Roaring 90s lasted an impressive 113 months and generated a mammoth 417% total gain in the S&P 500—the largest in history.

While overall economic growth was robust, the focal point of this bull market was the beginning of the Internet Age and emergence of dot-com companies. Despite weak fundamentals and high valuations, investors poured money into internet startups with high hopes of long-run profitability.

Looking Into The Crystal Ball

While it’s inevitable that the “Long, Slow Recovery” will one day come to an end, this record-breaking bull market has so far proven us wrong. For example, in 2016, a multivariate model designed by economists at JP Morgan predicted the chance of recession within three years to be 92%.

Perhaps this prediction was off because the market environment today is so fundamentally different. With the advent of big tech, five companies now comprise 18% of the S&P 500. Collectively, these five companies (Microsoft, Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook) have seen their market capitalizations grow by nearly $5 trillion since 2013.

Regardless of what happens, one thing is true: markets will continue to surprise us.

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Markets in a Minute

Asset Class Risk and Return Over the Last Decade (2010-2019)

Asset allocation is one of the most important decisions an investor can make. This chart shows asset class risk and return from 2010-2019.

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Asset Class Risk and Return

This Markets in a Minute Chart is available as a poster.

The Importance of Asset Classes

Asset allocation is one of the most important decisions an investor can make. In fact, studies have found that the percentage of each asset type held in a portfolio is a bigger contributor to returns than individual security selection.

However, it’s important for investors to select asset classes that align with their personal risk tolerance—which can differ based on how long they plan to hold an investment—and their targeted returns. This Markets in a Minute chart from New York Life Investments shows asset class risk and return data from 2010-2019 to highlight their different profiles.

Asset Class Risk and Return

To measure risk and return, we took annualized return and standard deviation data over the last ten years.

Annualized returns show what an investor would have earned over a timeframe if returns were compounded. It is useful because an investment’s value is dependent on the gains or losses experienced in prior time periods. For example, an investment that lost half of its value in the previous year would need to see a 100% return to break even.

Standard deviation indicates risk by measuring the amount of variation among a set of values. For example, equities have historically seen a wide range in returns, meaning they are more volatile and carry more risk. On the other hand, treasuries have typically seen a smaller range in returns, illustrating lower volatility levels.

Below is the risk and return for select asset classes from 2010-2019, organized from lowest return to highest return.

Asset ClassAnnualized ReturnAnnualized Standard Deviation
Global Commodities-5.38%16.60%
Emerging Markets Equity-0.89%16.95%
Treasury Coupons0.73%0.81%
Investment Grade Bonds3.17%2.92%
Hedge Funds4.05%5.70%
Corporate Bonds5.55%5.26%
Global Listed Private Equity5.59%18.63%
1-5yr High Yield Bonds6.71%1.00%
Global Equity6.75%12.50%
Global Equity - ESG Leaders6.87%12.03%
Taxable Municipal Bonds7.20%7.33%
Real Estate Investment Trusts8.44%11.03%
U.S. Mid Cap Equity11.00%13.60%
U.S. Large Cap Equity11.22%11.39%
Dividend-Paying Equity11.81%10.24%
U.S. Small Cap Equity11.87%14.46%

Note: See the bottom of the graphic for the specific indexes used.

Global commodities saw the lowest return over the last 10 years. Plummeting oil prices, and an equities bull market that left little demand for safe haven assets like precious metals, likely contributed to the asset class’ underperformance.

Backed by the U.S. federal government, Treasury coupons had the lowest volatility but also saw a relatively low return of 0.73%. In contrast, 1-5 year high yield bonds generated a return of 6.71% with only slightly more risk.

With the exception of emerging market equity, all selected equities had higher risk and relatively higher historical returns. Among the stocks shown, dividend-paying equity saw the highest returns relative to their risk level.

Building a Portfolio

As they consider asset class risk and return, investors should remember that historical performance does not indicate future results. In addition, the above data is somewhat limited in that it only shows performance during the recent bull market—and returns can vary in different stages of the market cycle. For example, commodities go through multi-decade periods of price ascent and decline known as super cycles.

However, historical information may help investors gauge the asset classes that are best suited to their personal goals. Whether an investor needs more stability to help save for a near-term vacation, or investments with higher return potential for retirement savings, they can build a portfolio tailored to their needs.

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Markets in a Minute

The Pyramid of Equity Returns: Almost 200 Years of U.S. Stock Performance

From 1825-2019, equities have had positive annual performance over 70% of the time. This chart shows historical U.S. stock market returns.

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historical stock market returns

This Markets in a Minute Chart is available as a poster.

Historical Stock Market Returns

After the fastest bear market drop in history, the S&P 500 rallied and now has a year-to-date total return of -4.7%. The year is not over, but in the context of history, is this in line with what’s considered a “normal” return, or is it more of an outlier?

In today’s Markets in a Minute chart from New York Life Investments, we show the distribution of U.S. equity returns over almost 200 years.

Total Returns By Year

The chart shows total annual returns, which assumes that dividends and other cash distributions are reinvested back into the index.

It’s also important to note that different indexes and data collection methods are used over the timeframe. From 1825-1925, numbers come from researchers at Yale University and Pennsylvania State University. They collected price and dividend data for almost all stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange during its early history.

From 1926-1956, returns are from the S&P 90, the S&P 500’s predecessor. Finally, from 1957 to date, returns are based on the S&P 500.

Here are historical stock market returns by year:

YearTotal Return
18252.53%
18262.03%
18272.97%
18282.82%
18293.21%
18302.83%
18311.70%
18323.02%
18332.94%
18342.91%
18352.83%
18361.59%
18372.11%
18386.27%
18395.28%
18403.53%
18414.87%
18425.77%
18437.18%
18446.85%
18454.16%
18463.36%
18475.55%
18485.17%
18497.60%
18503.73%
18514.44%
18524.52%
18534.11%
18541.99%
18552.09%
18563.00%
18573.39%
18582.83%
18592.86%
18602.41%
18613.21%
18623.60%
18633.52%
18644.18%
18653.97%
18664.39%
18674.50%
1868-
18694.18%
18704.20%
18715.86%
18726.33%
18736.51%
18747.47%
18756.61%
18766.86%
18775.31%
18785.54%
18795.80%
18805.28%
18815.48%
18825.32%
18835.65%
18845.81%
18855.53%
18864.23%
18874.43%
18884.36%
18894.28%
18904.14%
18914.78%
18924.44%
18934.54%
18944.76%
18954.42%
18964.17%
18974.27%
18984.21%
18993.72%
19004.98%
19014.66%
19024.15%
19034.35%
19044.72%
19054.00%
19064.19%
19074.47%
19086.09%
19094.87%
19104.56%
19115.19%
19125.27%
19135.12%
19145.22%
19155.85%
19165.91%
19177.04%
19188.38%
19196.71%
19205.72%
19216.75%
19226.98%
19236.04%
19246.43%
19255.91%
192611.62%
192737.49%
192843.61%
1929-8.42%
1930-24.90%
1931-43.34%
1932-8.19%
193353.99%
1934-1.44%
193547.67%
193633.92%
1937-35.03%
193831.12%
1939-0.41%
1940-9.78%
1941-11.59%
194220.34%
194325.90%
194419.75%
194536.44%
1946-8.07%
19475.71%
19485.50%
194918.79%
195031.71%
195124.02%
195218.37%
1953-0.99%
195452.62%
195531.56%
19566.56%
1957-10.78%
195843.36%
195911.96%
19600.47%
196126.89%
1962-8.73%
196322.80%
196416.48%
196512.45%
1966-10.06%
196723.98%
196811.06%
1969-8.50%
19704.01%
197114.31%
197218.98%
1973-14.66%
1974-26.47%
197537.20%
197623.84%
1977-7.18%
19786.56%
197918.44%
198032.42%
1981-4.91%
198221.55%
198322.56%
19846.27%
198531.73%
198618.67%
19875.25%
198816.61%
198931.69%
1990-3.10%
199130.47%
19927.62%
199310.08%
19941.32%
199537.58%
199622.96%
199733.36%
199828.58%
199921.04%
2000-9.10%
2001-11.89%
2002-22.10%
200328.68%
200410.88%
20054.91%
200615.79%
20075.49%
2008-37.00%
200926.46%
201015.06%
20112.11%
201216.00%
201332.39%
201413.69%
20151.38%
201611.96%
201721.83%
2018-4.38%
201931.49%

Source: Journal of Financial Markets, Slickcharts. The year 1868 has insufficient data to estimate a total annual return.

U.S. equity returns roughly follow a bell curve, meaning that values cluster near a central peak and values farther from the average are less common. Historically, they have been skewed towards positive performance.

Here is how the distribution of returns stack up:

Total Annual Return (%)-50 to -30-30 to -10-10 to 1010 to 3030 to 5050+
Number of Years Within Range3237765225
Percent of Years Within Range1.5%11.8%39.5%33.3%11.3%2.6%

While extreme returns can happen, almost 40% of annual returns have fallen within the -10% to 10% range.

Recessions and Recoveries

What does it look like when more abnormal returns occur? Due to the cyclical nature of the economy, recessions tend to be followed by strong recoveries.

recession and recovery stock market returns

In 1957, the year the S&P 500 was created, the stock market saw a loss of almost 11%. Stock prices shot up by over 43% the following year, bolstered by rising credit volumes and business profits.

Most recently, the 2008 global financial crisis led to one of the largest equity losses to date. In 2009, stocks climbed by almost 27%, boosted by expectations of higher capital spending and demand as the economy recovered.

What History Tells Us

While equities can have high volatility, returns have historically followed a positively-skewed bell curve distribution. From 1825-2019, the average total annual return was 8.25%. In fact, over 70% of total annual returns have been positive over the same timeframe.

Owning stocks long-term may help investors not only beat inflation, but also build a nest egg that may sustain them throughout their retirement years.

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